Tennis in the tropics

As much as I love being at the beach in Mexico, spending time with my older kids, I miss my husband and high school son, who had to stay behind for work and exams. Also, truth be told, I miss my DIRECTV French Open Mix Channel, where they give me six HD different channels to choose from during the first week of the tournament — sometimes they even show doubles matches, which ESPN almost never airs.  The Tennis Channel doesn’t even show doubles very often.

I’m having to make do with re-runs on ESPN-México in poor quality telecast. But it helps me work on my Spanish, and at least we’re at the tournament’s beginning. Yes I know, no one’s feeling sorry for me: my balcony looks out on the sea. There’s a lovely breeze blowing, and it’s air-conditioned inside if I prefer that. Who needs tennis right now?

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I did want to check out the courts here, though. Because rain was forecast for every day of our trip at the time I packed, I didn’t bother to bring my tennis gear. And in fact I had to wade through a flooded passageway to reach the rain-soaked courts our first day. They call the court surface “grass,” but it’s not exactly Wimbledon. It’s the same grass-carpet material my mother-in-law and countless other owners of Southern California ranch homes used to put down in their enclosed patios. However, the resort stretches the grass fabric and glues it down tight, so it works well.

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My husband and I played here years ago, and we enjoyed the so-called grass courts. We had to make sure to play before the sun rose too high, as the tropical heat makes it tough to run around in the afternoon. Maybe I’ll save the tennis for a different location — here, it’s time for a margarita.

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All-inclusive resorts: the good, the bad and the ugly

Greetings from Puerto Vallarta! I came here for the long weekend with my college kids and my son’s girlfriend. We’re staying at a property we used to enjoy when it was operated by Hoteles Camino Real, a high-end Mexican chain similar to Westin. But several years back the property changed hands and now is owned by AMResort’s Dreams. We have resisted returning to this location because Dreams resorts are all-inclusive properties — but since this was a short vacation, it seemed like a good chance to check things out.

Anne’s verdict: the location is as fabulous as ever, but the all-inclusive vacation model does not work for me.

The beauty of this location is that it lies about fifteen minutes south of the town of Puerto Vallarta on its own beach. Although Mexican beaches are public property, this one is inaccessible to outsiders to due to rocks on either side, and the road into the hotel is gated, so only hotel guests are allowed to enter. Thus the beach is clean, not crowded, and souvenir vendors are kept to a minimum. The surf is gentle enough to swim in. And yet, the shops and restaurants of PV are only a five-dollar cab ride away.

 

Saturday 26 May 2012

 

We were fortunate that Hurricane Bud brushed by us during the night and brought only heavy rain our first day and a half here. Today was partly cloudy, but much better than I had expected when checking the forecast before departing the Bay Area last week.

 

 

Sunday 27 May 2012

 

 

At the same time, this is my first experience with any type of all-inclusive vacation, where my room rate includes breakfast, lunch and dinner, plus all the drinks and snacks I want. The facilities are lovely, and in general the service is excellent. But they maximize profit margins by offering limited dining options, over-pricing pedestrian wines, and charging for “extra” services such as more than one wifi connection per room. (Sorry, when you’re from Silicon Valley, one Internet connection per room, even when on vacation, is not going to cut it.)

I would imagine the all-inclusive arrangement works well for larger groups, or for people who want to lock in their vacation expenses before leaving home. Also for folks who prefer to spend their vacations consuming alcohol throughout the day, and/or for those who prefer quantity over quality of food. We have witnessed both types of guests here.

Never mind: the breakfast buffet is perfect, we’ve  identified the best restaurant on property for lunch, and after one mediocre dinner on a rainy night when we couldn’t face going out, we committed to sampling the best of what Puerto Vallarta has to offer. Last night we went to an old favorite, the classic Daiquiri Dick’s, owned by a chef who moved down from Los Angeles years ago, and a sumptuous meal (with daiquiris and flaming coffee) cost only fifty dollars each.  Tonight we had what my son the foodie proclaimed our best meal yet at a place favored by locals, La Langosta Feliz, the Happy Lobster.

Here’s to living large — Salud!