US Open tennis fashion: the men

My last post highlighted a number of female players tennis fashion at the US Open. While men’s tennis fashion is rarely as interesting as women’s, this year shows some innovative patterns and, notably, more bright colors than we typically see in a single tournament.

Tennis fashion goes green

The most prominent color for men this year is green. Bright green. Neon green. It showed up on Milos Raonic, although I noticed his haircut as much as his shirt color.

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Milos Raonic, US Open Round 1

 

Crazy green works for Gael Monfils. Not only does it complement his dark skin, but also goes along with his unorthodox, acrobatic style that fans love so much.

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Gael Monfils, US Open Round 1

 

In addition to Raonic and Monfils, many more male players are sporting a similar color green, across a variety of labels. They include Jack Sock (also with a haircut), Marinko Matosevic, Juan Monaco, Lleyton Hewitt and Sam Querrey.

 

Murray’s tennis fashion: light on the green

Andy Murray wears just a touch of green on his wristbands and hat. Given all the other green shirts, his mostly-grey ensemble is refreshing.

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Andy Murray US Open Round 1

More bright colors in US Open tennis fashion

Green isn’t the only bright color showing up around the grounds in Flushing Meadows. Nick Kyrgios wore a particularly colorful shirt in his defeat of Mikhail Youhzny. Kyrgios is a relatively unknown Australian whose principal achievement since turning pro in 2013 was defeating Rafael Nadal at Wimbledon in 2014. Although the pinkish-orange purplish-blue shirt by Nike is hard to describe, it works well on him.

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Nick Kyrgios, US Open Round 1

 

Another player who can wear bright colors is Jo-Wilfried Tsonga. His orange shirt, sweatband and shoes look sharp against the white socks, shorts and hat.

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Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, US Open Round 1

 

Federer’s timeless tennis fashion

Contrasting with all these bright colors was Roger Federer’s all-black “evening” ensemble. Perhaps he’ll have a different outfit for daytime, but being the star that he is, Roger is playing his first and second round matches during primetime on Ashe.

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Roger Federer US Open Round 1 (Evening)

 

Djokovic’s tennis fashion: boring!

You may have noticed that so far I haven’t mentioned the top-seeded male player at the US Open, Novak Djokovic. That’s because, even though his game is impressive, his tennis fashion is not. Sponsored by Uniqlo, Nole wears basic-looking outfits. No special colors — just red, white, blue and black. Always the same style of polo shirt. For this tournament, he’s going with red and black, and his shoes go with the theme. I suppose he opts to make his mark with tennis pure and simple, not with tennis fashion.

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Novak Djokovic – US Open Round 1

 

There’s lots more tennis to be played, and if the early rounds are any indication, things are going to continue to be exciting on the courts. Enjoy the matches, and keep your eye out for new tennis fashion trends!

 

 

Image credits: various photographers via usopen.org

Olympics bring color to Wimbledon: Part II, the guys

Men’s Olympic Tennis Fashion

Yesterday I gave you my impressions of some of the top women player’s outfits. Now it’s the men’s turn. First, I have to disclose I was as disappointed as anyone that Nadal dropped out of the Olympics due to an undisclosed injury. Or at least that’s what he said. But could it be that he was not going to be caught dead in one of Spain’s uniforms? In case you missed it, field hockey player Alex Fabregas tweeted this photo of Spain’s opening ceremony get-up. Apparently Russian designer Bosco provided Spain the uniforms for free — at least the country’s current economic woes can’t be blamed on what they spent for Olympic garb.

Spaniards aside, most of the guys are looking good for the Olympics — adding a dash of color livens up their tennis fashion considerably after the Wimbledon whites. And, since they have to wear their country’s colors, we are seeing lots of standard combinations. In my opinion, this is generally a good thing: guys look better on-court when their sponsors don’t try to one-up each other with outlandish color combos.

Roger looks fabulous as always, with the classic tennis polo and discrete Swiss cross symbol on the chest.

 

Djokovic’s new sponsor, Uniqlo, has stepped up its design for him since the French Open and Wimbledon. They’re still not going for a super eye-catching look — but maybe they are letting Nole do that with his racquet. However, his blue shirt with striped collar is sharp-looking.  The Serbian flag on the chest is also a nice touch.

 

Tsonga’s bleu, rouge et blanche outfit by Adidas works well, whether he is running around the court or lying down on it. Don’t know whether the boxer waistband is part of his official look or not.

 

Isner’s blue shirt by Lacoste looks good with the dark navy or black shorts — it’s something different, as most of the guys wearing blue shirts pair them with white shorts. As our highest-ranked American male singles player (11), let’s hope he goes deep in the tournament and medals for the USA.

 

My favorite American duo, Bob and Mike Bryan, look great in their K-Swiss shirts with the bold red, navy and white slanting stripe-effect across the fronts.  Maybe the dark shorts are an American thing? No matter, they look strong and so does their game.

 

The “Brit kit” worn by Andy Murray was widely publicized prior to the Olympics, perhaps since Great Britain is the host country. Adidas went all-out in fashioning a shirt with colors and stripes reminiscent of the Union Jack — but of course, updated and way cooler. Love the coordination with the sweatbands.

It’s nice that the Olympics take place in the summer when one’s schedule typically slows down. But seriously: I’m sitting inside, glued to ladies doubles on my iPad when I could be out enjoying a perfect sunny day. At least NBC offers highlight videos and more information than I could ever absorb about the various Olympic sports — not to mention all the specialty websites and blogs out there if I want more commentary. So I could get up and go for a walk now, then watch the video later.

Our house, however, is a veritable sports-fest: TVs and computers going whenever people are home, sometimes with folks watching together and sometimes with us watching favorite sports on our own.

Enjoy your own couch-potato hours, and chime in with a comment on your favorite Olympic sport or fashion!