Looking for light this side of the equinox: excuses and enneagrams

We’re still seven weeks away from the vernal equinox, when the hours of daylight will equal the hours of darkness, heralding my favorite season of the year. I love the summer, when days are long, and light lasts well into the evening.

Light_Heart_Shaped_Sun

 

SAD: a lack of light

I think I need sunlight now more than ever. Lately, when friends have asked me if I’m still posting to my blog, I realize that my “holiday break” has continued well past New Year’s. My only excuse for my silence has been “the January malaise,” to which one friend replied, “Oh, you must be seasonal.” And I think she’s right. It may not be severe enough to be clinical, but I recognize in myself symptoms of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), which is a type of winter depression that overtakes mainly women due to lack of sunlight.

I have one of those SAD lights, but I don’t sit in front of it regularly, and I don’t start using it early in the fall, before I start feeling bad — so I don’t receive the benefits I’m supposed to get from it. Too bad I’m not like the dogs I saw on the ABC News, whose owners were kind enough to buy them daylight spectrum lights. Those depressed doggies apparently perked up after lying in front of the SAD lightboxes. You can check out the story and video here.

The Enneagram: en-light-ening?

I started to make a list of things I had done during the month of January, during which I did no writing or blogging, but after taking the Enneagram test online, I realized I probably need to fight my compulsion to ennumerate my accomplishments — that I should focus more on “being” and less on “doing.” This is because my top score on the quiz was that of the Enneagram 3, or The Achiever, who has a tendency to tie her sense of self-worth to her accomplishments. My second top score was even less encouraging: it was the 8, or the The Challenger, who is confident and assertive, but also prone to confrontation and intimidation. Not exactly what I needed to pull me out of a slump.

 

Enneagram Symbol

Courtesy of The Ennegram Institute

 

So in the spirit of not evaluating myself by how many checks I’ve put on the to-do list, I won’t go through the “incredible” (not really) things I did during my time away from the blog. I do have some plans coming up that may involve changing or adding to Second Serve, however, and those are exciting. Hopefully, with more sunlight in the days ahead, I’ll be able to get going on them.

Until then, I’ll be the lady searching for sun. But don’t get in my way, as apparently one of my possible Enneagram types won’t hesitate to elbow past you!

 

Image credits: iFreeze, Enneagram Institute

Blogging with the pros

Last week I attended my first blogging convention, BlogHerPRO. It was a mini-convention, lasting only one day — something that made me more willing  to try it. That, and its location in San Francisco enticed me — for a “local” such as myself, it was only an hour away. Although I was intimidated to enter the room, I found the experience invigorating, even transformative. Let me tell you why.

 

Blogging w the pros_SanFrancisco_BlogHerPRO2012

 

Blogging as a hobby

I started my blog in 2010 as a way to practice my writing. Also because I was fascinated by blogging technology and the fact that anyone could become a publisher just by putting stuff out there on the Internet. I figured blogging would be fun. Plus, it would be another outlet for me to “share” my opinions, in addition to offering them alongside grilled chicken at the dinner table.

Now, after two and a half years of blogging, I still tend to consider it one of my hobbies. My self-talk goes: “I’m a mom, an almost-empty-nester, a tennis player, sometimes a writer. Oh, and I have this blog. Check it out, it’s kind of cool.”

 

Enter: BlogHerPRO

But last week, I began to think of myself as a Blogger. The BlogHerPRO speakers included women who’ve built exemplary blogs and offered practical tips from their own experience. I absorbed an information-packed day with presentations by folks like Maria Ross of Red Slice, Catherine McCord of Weelicious, Carly Knobloch of Digitwirl and Elise Bauer of Simply Recipes.

For me, however, the highest value in attending BlogHerPRO came from conversations with other attendees. Although I felt intimidated going into the day, it was probably the most welcoming large-group event I’ve encountered. I’m bad at estimating crowd sizes, but I would guess over 200 women attended. Two hundred more bloggers, all of them female, than I’d ever seen in one place before.

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